Watch the video below to get more tips on this

The overview or summary is a very important part of your task 1 answer. Before you write your overview, you need to identify the key features, trends or differences. Look at the 'big picture' rather than small details, and summarise the information without mentioning any numbers.

IELTS Writing Task 1: identifying key features / trends

Watch the video below to get more tips on this The overview or summary is a very important part of your task 1 answer. Before you write your overview, you need to identify the key features, trends or differences. Look at the 'big picture' rather than small details, and summarise the information without mentioning any numbers.

Continue reading "IELTS Writing Task 1: identifying key features / trends"

Most student wonder  whether it's a good idea to give long, detailed answers or short, direct answers in part 1 of the speaking test. Let's look at two example answers for the same question.

Question:
What do you dislike about your school or your job?

Long, detailed answer:
As much as I enjoy teaching and derive a lot of pleasure from it, there are certain aspects of this occupation that are not so desirable, just like any other line of work, really. One of those things is the unsocial working hours. Teachers usually have to teach in the evening because that’s the only time that makes sense for students and working adults. On top of that, the workload is colossal. I mean, we have to spend a lot of time marking students’ essays and answering students’ questions, and all this invisible hard graft is usually not appreciated. So being a teacher is no small task.

Short, direct answer:
I’d have to say that marking essays is my least favourite aspect of my job as a teacher, because marking is time-consuming and it requires a lot of concentration to do it properly.

My Advice

Give short and direct answers in the part 1

  1. Firstly thats whats expected of you .  The test is structured in 3 parts . In the first part you are expected to answer the question directly without beating about the bush .

  2. Secondly Short answers help reduce grammar and sentence construction mistakes .

  3. And lastly , it's important to answer the question asked and not making up your own question.

Should You Give Short or Long Answers in IELTS Speaking Part 1?

 Most student wonder  whether it's a good idea to give long, detailed answers or short, direct answers in part 1 of the speaking test. Let's look at two example answers for the same question. Question: What do you dislike about your school or your job? Long, detailed answer: As much as I enjoy teaching […]

Continue reading "Should You Give Short or Long Answers in IELTS Speaking Part 1?"

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Organizations today are in constant flux. Industries are consolidating, new business models are emerging, new technologies are being developed, and consumer behaviors are evolving. For executives, the ever-increasing pace of change can be especially demanding. It forces them to understand and quickly respond to big shifts in the way companies operate and how work must get done. In the words of Arie de Geus, a business theorist, The ability to learn faster than your competitors may be the only sustainable competitive advantage.

[/vc_column_text][wgl_spacing spacer_size="17px"][vc_column_text]I’m not talking about relaxed armchair or even structured classroom learning. I’m talking about resisting the bias against doing new things, scanning the horizon for growth opportunities, and pushing yourself to acquire radically different capabilities—while still performing your job. That requires a willingness to experiment and become a novice again and again: an extremely discomforting notion for most of us.[/vc_column_text][wgl_spacing spacer_size="33px"][vc_column_text]

Share What You’ve Learnt

[/vc_column_text][wgl_spacing spacer_size="16px"][vc_column_text]Over decades of coaching and consulting to thousands of executives in a variety of industries, however, my colleagues and I have come across people who succeed at this kind of learning. We’ve identified four attributes they have in spades: aspiration, self-awareness, curiosity, and vulnerability. They truly want to understand and master new skills; they see themselves very clearly; they constantly think of and ask good questions; and they tolerate their own mistakes as they move up the learning curve.[/vc_column_text][wgl_spacing spacer_size="41px"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column css=".vc_custom_1562834963653{padding-right: 0px !important;padding-left: 0px !important;}"][wgl_carousel slide_to_show="2" use_pagination="" prev_next_bg_color="rgba(51,57,73,0.8)" slides_to_scroll="true" infinite="true" use_prev_next="true" custom_prev_next_color="true"][vc_single_image image="330" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1569573220097{border-radius: 10px !important;}"][vc_single_image image="331" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1569573227948{border-radius: 10px !important;}"][vc_single_image image="332" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1569573234410{border-radius: 10px !important;}"][/wgl_carousel][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][wgl_spacing spacer_size="41px"][vc_column_text]

Of course, these things come more naturally to some people than to others. But, drawing on research in psychology and management as well as our work with clients, we have identified some fairly simple mental tools anyone can develop to boost all four attributes—even those that are often considered fixed (aspiration, curiosity, and vulnerability).[/vc_column_text][wgl_spacing spacer_size="31px"][vc_column_text]

Focusing on benefits, not challenges, is a good way to increase your aspiration. There are no secrets to success.

- james jackson

[/vc_column_text][wgl_spacing spacer_size="13px"][vc_column_text]It’s easy to see aspiration as either there or not: You want to learn a new skill or you don’t; you have ambition and motivation or you lack them. But great learners can raise their aspiration level—and that’s key, because everyone is guilty of sometimes resisting development that is critical to success.[/vc_column_text][wgl_spacing spacer_size="33px"][vc_column_text]

Make Yourself Accountable

[/vc_column_text][wgl_spacing spacer_size="22px"][vc_column_text]Over the past decade or so, most leaders have grown familiar with the concept of self-awareness. They understand that they need to solicit feedback and recognize how others see them. But when it comes to the need for learning, our assessments of ourselves—what we know and don’t know, skills we have and don’t have—can still be woefully inaccurate. In one study conducted by David Dunning, a Cornell University psychologist, 94% of college professors reported that they were doing “above average work.”[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][wgl_spacing spacer_size="40px"][vc_single_image image="2430" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1569573835428{border-radius: 10px !important;}"][wgl_spacing spacer_size="41px"][vc_column_text]Let’s say your boss has told you that your team isn’t strong enough and that you need to get better at assessing and developing talent. Your initial reaction might be something like What? She’s wrong. My team is strong. Most of us respond defensively to that sort of criticism. But as soon as you recognize what you’re thinking, ask yourself, Is that accurate? What facts do I have to support it? In the process of reflection you may discover that you’re wrong and your boss is right, or that the truth lies somewhere in between—you cover for some of your reports by doing things yourself, and one of them is inconsistent in meeting deadlines; however, two others are stars.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Tips to Help You Avoid Awkward Networking

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text] Organizations today are in constant flux. Industries are consolidating, new business models are emerging, new technologies are being developed, and consumer behaviors are evolving. For executives, the ever-increasing pace of change can be especially demanding. It forces them to understand and quickly respond to big shifts in the way companies operate and how work […]

Continue reading "Tips to Help You Avoid Awkward Networking"

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

Organizations today are in constant flux. Industries are consolidating, new business models are emerging, new technologies are being developed, and consumer behaviors are evolving. For executives, the ever-increasing pace of change can be especially demanding. It forces them to understand and quickly respond to big shifts in the way companies operate and how work must get done. In the words of Arie de Geus, a business theorist, The ability to learn faster than your competitors may be the only sustainable competitive advantage.

[/vc_column_text][wgl_spacing spacer_size="17px"][vc_column_text]I’m not talking about relaxed armchair or even structured classroom learning. I’m talking about resisting the bias against doing new things, scanning the horizon for growth opportunities, and pushing yourself to acquire radically different capabilities—while still performing your job. That requires a willingness to experiment and become a novice again and again: an extremely discomforting notion for most of us.[/vc_column_text][wgl_spacing spacer_size="33px"][vc_column_text]

Share What You’ve Learnt

[/vc_column_text][wgl_spacing spacer_size="16px"][vc_column_text]Over decades of coaching and consulting to thousands of executives in a variety of industries, however, my colleagues and I have come across people who succeed at this kind of learning. We’ve identified four attributes they have in spades: aspiration, self-awareness, curiosity, and vulnerability. They truly want to understand and master new skills; they see themselves very clearly; they constantly think of and ask good questions; and they tolerate their own mistakes as they move up the learning curve.[/vc_column_text][wgl_spacing spacer_size="41px"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column css=".vc_custom_1562834963653{padding-right: 0px !important;padding-left: 0px !important;}"][wgl_carousel slide_to_show="2" use_pagination="" prev_next_bg_color="rgba(51,57,73,0.8)" slides_to_scroll="true" infinite="true" use_prev_next="true" custom_prev_next_color="true"][vc_single_image image="330" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1569573220097{border-radius: 10px !important;}"][vc_single_image image="331" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1569573227948{border-radius: 10px !important;}"][vc_single_image image="332" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1569573234410{border-radius: 10px !important;}"][/wgl_carousel][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][wgl_spacing spacer_size="41px"][vc_column_text]

Of course, these things come more naturally to some people than to others. But, drawing on research in psychology and management as well as our work with clients, we have identified some fairly simple mental tools anyone can develop to boost all four attributes—even those that are often considered fixed (aspiration, curiosity, and vulnerability).[/vc_column_text][wgl_spacing spacer_size="31px"][vc_column_text]

Focusing on benefits, not challenges, is a good way to increase your aspiration. There are no secrets to success.

- james jackson

[/vc_column_text][wgl_spacing spacer_size="13px"][vc_column_text]It’s easy to see aspiration as either there or not: You want to learn a new skill or you don’t; you have ambition and motivation or you lack them. But great learners can raise their aspiration level—and that’s key, because everyone is guilty of sometimes resisting development that is critical to success.[/vc_column_text][wgl_spacing spacer_size="33px"][vc_column_text]

Make Yourself Accountable

[/vc_column_text][wgl_spacing spacer_size="22px"][vc_column_text]Over the past decade or so, most leaders have grown familiar with the concept of self-awareness. They understand that they need to solicit feedback and recognize how others see them. But when it comes to the need for learning, our assessments of ourselves—what we know and don’t know, skills we have and don’t have—can still be woefully inaccurate. In one study conducted by David Dunning, a Cornell University psychologist, 94% of college professors reported that they were doing “above average work.”[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][wgl_spacing spacer_size="40px"][vc_single_image image="2430" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1569573835428{border-radius: 10px !important;}"][wgl_spacing spacer_size="41px"][vc_column_text]Let’s say your boss has told you that your team isn’t strong enough and that you need to get better at assessing and developing talent. Your initial reaction might be something like What? She’s wrong. My team is strong. Most of us respond defensively to that sort of criticism. But as soon as you recognize what you’re thinking, ask yourself, Is that accurate? What facts do I have to support it? In the process of reflection you may discover that you’re wrong and your boss is right, or that the truth lies somewhere in between—you cover for some of your reports by doing things yourself, and one of them is inconsistent in meeting deadlines; however, two others are stars.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Tips to Help You Avoid Awkward Networking

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text] Organizations today are in constant flux. Industries are consolidating, new business models are emerging, new technologies are being developed, and consumer behaviors are evolving. For executives, the ever-increasing pace of change can be especially demanding. It forces them to understand and quickly respond to big shifts in the way companies operate and how work […]

Continue reading "Tips to Help You Avoid Awkward Networking"

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